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>>> i want to on "nightline" another war? the breaking plus. u.s. and allies prepare to intervene in the bloody war in libya after the u.n. authorizes military action against gadhafi's forces. >> and in a worldwide exclusive, gadhafi's sons talk from tripoli tonight. >>> plus, nuclear code red. we have the latest on the desperate efforts of the japanese to stop the deadly chain of events from turning into a all-out nuclear catastrophe. are they at the point of no return? >>> and the inconvenient truth. the race to cool a stockpile of radioactive fuel rods getting dangerously hot and what scientists fear if that race is lost. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good evening. i'm cynthia mcfadden. we begin in libya where the u.s. and its allies appear poised to take military action on the heels of a u.n. resolution earlier this evening imposing a no-fly zone over the country and authorizing quote, all necessary measures to protect civilians. hours earlier, libya -- we spoke to gadhafi's son. christiane joins me now. you were just in libya, what can you tell us? >> well, i think they
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technolo
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
and slaughtering his people. now new signs the u.s. navy is ready to take action. and the crisis in japan. experts raise the threat level now amid severe damage at the nuclear plant at fukushima. a high probability of significant public exposure even death. i'm serpd smith live in new york. the news starts now. >> helicopters, water canons, they tried fire hoses. now, it may be time to try something else. tonight, exploring the chernobyl option. is libya backing down? after the united nations okayed a no-fly zone, the regime reportedly declared a cease-fire. what's really going on on the ground. >> this is a fluid and dynamic situation. >> once more, my maury qaddafi has a choice. >> tonight, is is qaddafi playing games and is it time to use force? >> shepard: first from fox this friday night, a fox news alert the libyan government denies that military forces plan to enter the rebel held strong hold of benghazi in the eastern part of that country. this, an official admits that the army in that area but says that their presence does not violate the cease-fire that tripoli announced earlier today. >
obama from the east room of the white house essentially saying the u.s. will help lead the international enforcement of a no-fly zone over libya. he also took some time there outlining what american forces will not be doing. >> the united states is not going to deploy ground troops into libya and we are not going the use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. >> in moments i'll be speaking live with nic robertson in libya and wolf blitzer about who makes the next move here. that's in just a moment. we're also learning here as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunam
arranged by u.s. embassy left friday morning. there is a bus on its way from sendai to tokyo right now and many will also be taking those charter flights back to the u.s. it's the first wave of american citizens who will be making their way back home out of concern for uncertainty of the nuclear threat on the ground. all of the focus on the nuclear reactor, though, has overshadowed a humanitarian crisis that continues to unfold to the north of us. the death toll now stands at more than 6,000, more than 10,000 still missing. and we're hearing some evacuation centers are still waiting for supplies a week after the earthquake hit. >> and, akiko, one of the factors of this story many people continue to worry about are the workers there around the plant, in the plant. what is the latest on them? >> reporter: well, we are learning more about the operation that's under way. we understand there's about 20 0 to 300 workers involved in this last-ditch effort. they're rotating about 50 workers at a time. we know they're sleeping in a small living room. they are running out of food. we have not le
residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moammar gadhafi. he's seen in the video there. many saying this really does pave the way for a military action. what could that mean? what could it look like? we'll get you the very latest on that coming up here. >> exactly. but first let's begin with the very latest on the disaster in japan. the danger level is being raised in
chris lawrence with a look at what role the u.s. might play in the no-fly zone. chris, live at the pentagon, what's on deck for the u.s. now that the un has passed this? >> ali, the u.s. air force has a base in italy, the navy has two, and the italians have already okayed the use of their area to launch some of the missions in this know fly zone. there was an aircraft carrier in the mediterranean sea near libya. it left earlier this week and is now out in the arabian sea. without a carrier, planes will have to fly possibly farther, which means they won't be able to spend as much time over libyan aerospace which means you may need more planes to carry out the mission. some of the officials i've spoken with here in the pentagon say don't just think of a no-fly as american fighter pilots flying american jets. there are other ways in which the u.s. can contribute. unmanned drones, for instance. the u.s. also has signal-jamming aircraft that could disrupt colonel gadhafi's ability to communicate with his forces. overall what you'll have to do is have a very clear line of command
developments on two big stories. is the u.s. preparing to bomb libya? the u.n.'s major decision to protect libyan civilians from the gadhafi regime. >>> and also the race to stop a nuclear disaster in japan. today's desperate emergency action to stop an all outright meltdown. it is friday, march 18th. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. >>> military action against libya could happen in just a matter of hours. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's son interviewed exclusively with abc news is now responding and is as defiant as ever. >>> and as nuclear crisis escalates in japan, the west coast of the united states is now on alert already monitoring radiation levels there. >> it's funny, too, because they say they have those monitors up already. in seattle, your hometown, will be the first place to know if a wave does hit us. >> and the epa will be watching that closely. that's for sure. >>> we do begin with the dramatic decision to take military action in libya. the u.n. security council voted just hours ago. >> and now the u.s., france, britain and other countries ar
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
the dax. now, after two days of heavy losses as the nuclear crisis continues to unfold in japan, u.s. stocks also ended the day higher on thursday. investor sentiment was lifted by an upbeat look. here's how the numbers settled. take a look at that, dow jones industrial average adding 1.4%, broader gains and also the nasdaq closing up .75% higher. >>> u.s. markets look set for a higher open when trading begins later today. this is where u.s. futures stand at the moment. we could see the dow jones industrial average opening up by .8% higher, nasdaq composite potentially putting on a gain of 1%. at the moment, futures indicate we could see the broader s&p rising about .8%. those markets poised to start the day higher, pauline, but nothing could happen between now and the opening bell. >> yes, but hopefully this is starting a trend. >>> well, just ahead, the u.n. steps up the pressure on moammar gadhafi. but how much will the security council's resolution help the rebels in the eastern part of the country? we'll check out the situation there in just a moment. [ sneezing ] ♪ [ male ann
changed for the u.s., do you think? >> what changed was the arab league to vote over the weekend. it was clear that there was going to be arab involvement in this move towards airstrikes which has been led by britain and france. america and president obama decided that the conditions were right to adopt a much more muscular approach at the security council this week. this probably would not have happened without america's vigorous support. crucially, of course, we have these five abstentions. 10 votes in favor and five against led by china and russia. interestingly of course, in that group is germany. germany, the biggest country in the european union, has very serious feelings about whether the air strikes are possible or whether they will lead to a potential escalation or a regional conflict. >> any of the ambassador's apart from the germans talk about military actions about strategic air strikes? >> no, what we had is a lot of rhetoric and a lot of show of unity. there is a tension. clearly no one is sure how this military action is going to proceed from here on in. president
's commitment to the cease-fire. it was originally a french-sponsored resolution, french and the brits. the u.s. got on board yesterday and it passed and now the president is being criticized and defended by both parties. it's not breaking down along ideological lines and there are a lot of concerns about whether the united states can afford this effort, whether this turns into nation-building, whether the president needed to go to the congress to get permission to do this and he, himself, may have suggested when he was a candidate what the president of the united states would do in a situation like this and whether the u.s. can sit back and not do anything in terms of getting involved in this battle, as we have been for weeks. some of the questions examined during today's show. in the meantime, another fox news alert. major developments in the battle over union rights and the budget in wisconsin. a judge has just temporarily blocked a new state law from taking effect. he's issued a temporary restraining order saying it will not go into effect. that law was hard fought over in wisconsin and eli
. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthquake hit. amateur video shows scenes of homes inside, while outside a tsunami brought its own terror, sweep
's not going to change. but it seems that the u.s. is trying to do a last-ditch effort to prevent a slaughter in benghazi. and saif gadhafi said, don't bomb us. it was very strange. listen to what he said. >> we want, even americans, to help us get rid of the remnants of those people and have a peaceful country. we want you to help us 20, you know, middle east democracy. more freedom. being peaceful. but not to threaten us with air strikes. we will not be afraid. >> and he said whatever happens is not going to cause his father to leave office. >> but i couldn't help but when we were listening with george. if you're waking up this morning and you hear that his father is considering shooting down passenger planes. american passenger planes. is he serious about that? >> well, the defense minister made that threat. and they did do lockerbie. they've taken admission for it. they do do that. clearly, one of the things that happens is you have to be prepared for some kind of retaliation. and they're threatening terrorism. >> what's your gut here? >> the gut is they don't have significant air defense
. >> thank you, jade. >>> we're also monitoring a briefing happening right now in washington, d.c. now, u.s. nuclear experts are part of the briefing. we're gone bring you their analysis. there you see a live picture. we'll bring you their latest analysis coming up at 7:30. >>> 7:50. today, japan's prime minister in a national tv address called on the japanese people to reunite in rebuilding the country from scratch. also today, japan increased the alert of its nuclear crisis from level 4 to level 5 on a scale of 7. fire trucks sprayed water on overheated reactors at the nuclear plant again today, trying to prevent a meltdown and there's still -- they are still frantically trying to install a power line to the plant, hoping to get the cooling systems working again. it's now been exactly one week since the disastrous quake and tsunami rocked japan. several hours ago, survivors all across that country marked this tragedy with a moment of silence. >>> and the death toll from the japanese quake and tsunami disaster keeps climbing to staggering levels. the latest casualty numbers show 6500 are c
stops in chile and el salvador. the trip is aimed at reinforcing u.s. ties with latin america. it's a tough time, though, for president obama to leave on a foreign trip. he is already dealing with a nuclear crisis in japan, fighting in libya and turmoil in the mideast. >>> 4:45. house of representatives has voted to cut federal funding to npr. the house voted along party lines to end federal funding, lot senate passage is very unlikely. it's home to programs like car talk and all thing considered. recently an npr employee was overheard saying they don't need federal funding. >>> beginning march 28, the "new york times" will begin charging for unlimited access to its website and mobile services. the fees will range from $15 to $35 a month depending on what level of access you want. print subscribers will not be charged. >>> 4:46. the bay area custodian under arrest after a disturbing crime on campus. that story coming up. >>> people in the south bay sound off on a new proposed area code. their concerns coming up. >>> when it comes to reliability, the best car to buy. a school on th
that if something like this happens in the u.s. that you'll have the ability, and i understand apparently from some of the testimony, what i've read is apparently you guys are in charge. in terms of implementing, you're the go-to people now? is that accurate in terms of dictating who does what and who's in charge? an ongoing plan that's developing? >> in response to nuclear power plant, the inside of the facility is regulated by nuclear regulatory commission. outside of the plant is actually the local and state responders with fema supporting them. if you have a scenario that resulted in release, the most important thing to occur is successfully evacuate people away from that plant. those the type of things that the exercise plans work on. these are the things that local and state officials train against, and our role of the federal government, to support them we additional resources required in the event of an evacuations had to take place. those are the thing, and i think from a standpoint of your question, if you would like senators to have our staff, reach out with the state and give your staff
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
for the weeks to come. sandra thank you very much. jon: there is breaking news on the fate of four u.s. times journal lises who had been reported missing in libya. they were captured by forces loyal to moammar gadhafi and they will be released today. they last had been in contact with their editors on tuesday in a northern port city, that's where they were covering the repeat of rebel forces. jenna: fox news has teams on the ground in tripoli, also benge aras you saw rick leventhal there. we are also reporting from the white house, the pentagon. we are reporting this story from every angle. for the latest log onto we and check it out. jon: breaking news, japan's nuclear agency is raising the severity of its nuclear accident putting it on par with the 1979 three-mile island accident in this country in pennsylvania. this as crews wage a frantic effort to try to cool down the radioactive fuel rods. they are spraying water on the damaged reactors from military fire trucks. workers also are racing to restore power at the crippled reactors. electricity will hopefully restart the pumps n
. here's what the u.s. surgeon general vice admiral benjamin has to say about it. >> we're exposed to radiation every day in our world and our society. but they are levels that are not harmful. and the harmful levels are not coming. so i think, listen up for your local and state health departments. the government is constantly monitoring. if there is any concern, we will certainly get that message out to you here quickly but right now you're not at risk. >> meanwhile, here in the bay area, the university of california berkeley, scientists have already discovered what they say are radioactive particles from that plume coming from japan. they have made some measurements. they say there's a whole soup of different kinds of particles that are reaching here but they say so far the levels are all very low. by comparison, one uc-berkeley professor said, the amount of radiation you get this plume would be less than you would get on an airplane flight across the country. frank? >> even so, though, don, i know a lot of people, we had stories earlier this week that they were buying those, wha
dead. it happened around 9 o-clock last night... inside "u-s fried chicken" along pennsylvania avenue. a 29 year neck.. and was prooonuced dead at shock trauma.the other person, shot in the leg is expected to ord on a suspect at thisstime. a ar crash leaves one perron around o clock on honeygo boulevard and ebenezer road in a light pole ... the passenger wws thrown from it.that person was pronounced dead at the scene.the driver is listed in serious conditon at the hospital. in baltimore... leaving him r badly brrised and scarred. scarred. some believe the child... 11 year-old tyshawn thomas kyle... was targeted because of his special needs. now... questions are emerging... about whh school administrators didn't step in sooner... to stop tttyshawn was attacked tuesday... by a feelow student in school.but his mother says hours passee... beeore she learned what had happened. 13:39:18 i feel hopeless because mm child ii crying to me mommy why mm why is it my fault what did i do... i have no answerssfor that it's unaccee unacceptable the school system later released a statement...
. >> the president saying that u.s. ground force would not be part of that effort which apparently will be led by french and british soldiers. gadhafi's government has declared a cease-fire in an apparent bid to ward off strikes but that cease-fire apparently includes reports from rebels that they are still being shelved. two cities, including misrata reportedly still under attack. rebels in the eastern stronghold of benghazi are fortifying positions against a gadhafi attack and welcoming outside attack. >> gadhafi is not good. gadhaf is very, very dangerous. >> wait for france to bring battalion for the gadhafi forces and for us staying here we're waiting for our orders to move forward. >> course this action is in sharp contrast to the western response to events in yemen let alone u.s. supported dare i say it bank rolled allies like bahrain and saudi arabia who have been using our own weapons to crack down on their own people. their efforts met with stern words of warning from our country. joining us now lieutenant colonel tony shaf fer, former intelligence officer and with us from london phi
government through april 8th. and today is the last day for members of the u.s. military to final for an additional $500 per month in retroactive pay if their term of duty was extended through the pentagon's stop loss policy. >> thank you, carol. live from studio 7, want to get you up to speed for friday, march 18th. fast moving developments out of libya. the gadhafi regime raced to head off a military attack today by offering a cease-fire to the rebels. joining us on the phone is a member of the opposition provincial council and this is essentially what is taking place on the ground. tell us you are in eastern libya now. are you seeing a cease fire or are you seeing explosions? >> i am a member of the local council. misrata is on the west of libya, east of tripoli 200 kilometers. it is the last -- it is the last strong hold here on the west side. gadhafi is trying to take misrata at all costs. he started bombing the city last night at 2:00, random shelling of the city. at least threeky lom meters from the center of the city and shells landed near my home. he entered the city from
is raising the severity level of the nuclear crisis. >> and the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says it will now undergo a review after president obama ordered them to take a look at all nuclear plants. more americans are returning whom >> reporter: the line is long in tokyo airport. for some, the fear of radiation is too much to handling. we have been advised by the u.s. ambassador and a nuclear expert friend of mine that we should get out of here now. otherwise, we would not leave. we love it here. >> it's for my children that i scare. >> some are bringing trace radiation. >> does it concern you that they found trace radiation levels on these planes? >> i didn't know that. i didn't know that. that is a little concerning. sure, it is aren't i would go the other way. i'm not that concerned. i think it's going to be minor at this point. >> reporter: a medical shipment from dallas also showed a small amount of radiation. they are keeping the aircraft away from any potentially radioactive clouds that they are dog. atmospheric monitoring stations in northern california -- southern califo
in the earthquake and tsunami a week ago. the u.s. president barack obama has said the libyan leader colonel gaddafi must obey the u.n. demands or face military action. earlier, the libyan government announced an immediate ceasefire and promised to follow the u.n. resolution passed on thursday. he said colonel gaddafi had to stop all attacks on civilians, pull back his troops, and allow in humanitarian aid. >> now once more, muammar gaddafi has a choice. the resolution that passed lays out very clear conditions that must be met. the united states, the united kingdom, france, and arab states agree that a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. that means all attacks against civilians must stop. gaddafi must stop his troops from advancing on benghazi. he must pull them back from misurata and established water, gas, and electricity supplies to all areas. humanitarian assistance must be allowed to reach the people of libya. let me be clear. these terms are not negotiable. >> in the libyan capital of tripoli, there is dismay and anger at the u.n. decision. many see the rebellion as a criminal
detected in the air fill system and luggage, it was also detected on passengers. u.s. customs officials are denying that. dhs has started screening passengers and cargo coming into l.a.x. from japan. as the golden state braces for a potentially dangerous radioactive plume coming from japan. the united states projects the plume will drift across the pacific hitting the aleutian islands first then southern california, late tomorrow. joining me on this and more is shepard smith. shep, every 24 hours there there's a lot of news developing. of course the fear this worst-case scenario about the reactors is the latest? >> shepard: the latest is me may be close to a fix at least they hope so. been working on this powerline. it amounts to a 6/10 of a mile line extension cord, if you will. from the main grid to the reactor number 2 at the fukushima nuclear plant. the hope is they will get that back online. they've been telling us the last hour they are hoping to have it done within the next couple of hours that would allow them to put water automatically on to the rods the nuclear fuel rods so pe
. there will be lots of different panel discussions across u.s. history. sunday night at 8:00 p.m., our guest is the president and ceo of the partnership for new york city. she is also a member of the federal reserve bank of new york. she will discuss the role of the federal reserve bank and other topics. thank you very much for being with us on an interesting friday morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the turn of events in libya today, the country has declared a cease-fire in their attacks on anti-government rebels, possibly in response to the action by the u.n. last night. the security council declared a no-fly zone of the country, voting authorize all necessary measures to protect the libyan people, including air strikes. the associated press reported about one hour ago that libya's foreign minister announced a ceasefire and stoppage of all military operations, saying it will take the country back to safety and ensure security for all libyans. he also criti
a country that has not attacked us? >> you know, i think barack obama and the u.s. is obviously in a tough place here. a country like the united states, there's a -- we have fundamental values that we are in favor of. and you know, gadhafi, you never know what he is going to do. there's always the potential of humanitarian disaster in libya. and i think that starting off with the u.n. resolution, the idea of the no-fly zone is a good start. do i believe that you need to move cautiously but i don't think the united states can just sit back and watch some terrible happening unfold in libya. >> especially if the president makes pronouncements like he has. especially the fact that he has been saying that gadhafi must go. i don't know what this has done to his credibility to not act on it. >> did the president make the right call? >> we're not doing this unilaterally. you said repeatedly on this show that the united states shouldn't go in there themselves, shouldn't be the world's policeman. >> agreed. >> we went to the u.n., particularly france, somewhat amazingly were in favor of going in the
: in the meantime as we follow japan at the eyes are turning to a power plant and the u.s.. one of their reactors was not working. for 18 months, operators at the diablo canyon nuclear plant near san luis obispo didn't realize that a system to pump water into one of emergency wasn't working. it disabled by the plant's own engineers, according to a report issued thursday on reactors in the united lists 14 recent "near misses" instances in which serious problems at a plant required federal regulators to respond. the report criticizes both plant operators and the nuclear regulatory commission for allowing some known safety issues to fester. >>mark: at a quick break as we continue. the latest of libya as the un declares a " no-fly " zone. more on the storm coming up. >>darya: 710 m and looking at san francisco called. a bit of a break but not for long. >>mark: major developments in libya. it now declaring a cease-fire and stopping all military options. the decision is coming after the u.s. and authorized a " no- fly " zone. they're sending in fighter jets and that comment ours. britain, france and t
. >> welcome to bbc world news. the headlines -- the u.s. to carry council? action against colonel gaddafi with a resolution to -- the un council backs action against colonel gaddafi with a resolution. celebrations in been gaungazi ae news of the resolution reaches the rebels. desperate for aid, more than 300,000 people are still homeless and food is in short supply. >> the united nations security council has approved a resolution for the creation of a no-fly zone to protect the people of libya. the resolution calls for all necessary measures, but rules out the use of foreign ground troops. 10 countries voted in favor and none were against. there were five abstentions, including russia and china. >> when it came, there was no opposition to the plan that britain, france, and 11 on had presented. sit -- significantly, both russia and china were among the five countries to abstain. afterwards, britain made clear why its government felt it had to act. >> the world should not stand by and accept the dump the hospitality against his own people. this resolution. tonight in the united nations secu
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)